Item #5027 Hernach volgt des Bluthundts, der sych nennedt ein Türckischen Keiser, gethaten, so er und die seinen, nach eroberu(n)g der schlacht, auff den xxviii. tag Augusti nechstvergange(n) geschehe(n), an unseren mitbrüdern der Ungrische(n) lantschafften ga(n)tz unme(n)schlich triben hat, un(d) noch teglich tut. WARFARE. OTTOMANS. Anon.
Hernach volgt des Bluthundts, der sych nennedt ein Türckischen Keiser, gethaten, so er und die seinen, nach eroberu(n)g der schlacht, auff den xxviii. tag Augusti nechstvergange(n) geschehe(n), an unseren mitbrüdern der Ungrische(n) lantschafften ga(n)tz unme(n)schlich triben hat, un(d) noch teglich tut.
Hernach volgt des Bluthundts, der sych nennedt ein Türckischen Keiser, gethaten, so er und die seinen, nach eroberu(n)g der schlacht, auff den xxviii. tag Augusti nechstvergange(n) geschehe(n), an unseren mitbrüdern der Ungrische(n) lantschafften ga(n)tz unme(n)schlich triben hat, un(d) noch teglich tut.
Hernach volgt des Bluthundts, der sych nennedt ein Türckischen Keiser, gethaten, so er und die seinen, nach eroberu(n)g der schlacht, auff den xxviii. tag Augusti nechstvergange(n) geschehe(n), an unseren mitbrüdern der Ungrische(n) lantschafften ga(n)tz unme(n)schlich triben hat, un(d) noch teglich tut.

Hernach volgt des Bluthundts, der sych nennedt ein Türckischen Keiser, gethaten, so er und die seinen, nach eroberu(n)g der schlacht, auff den xxviii. tag Augusti nechstvergange(n) geschehe(n), an unseren mitbrüdern der Ungrische(n) lantschafften ga(n)tz unme(n)schlich triben hat, un(d) noch teglich tut.

Augsburg: Heinrich Steiner, 1526.

Price: $7,500.00

Quarto: 19.5 x 16 cm. [8]p.

Bound in modern wrappers Light spotting and damp-staining to the margins. According to VD 16, this is one of seven editions printed in the year of the first, and the only one printed in Augsburg.

One of the earliest accounts of the Battle of Mohács, waged between the Kingdom of Hungary under Louis II and the Ottoman Empire led by Sultan Süleyman the Magnificent, in which Hungary suffered a crushing defeat.

This account, “Hereafter follow the deeds of the bloodhound who calls himself a Turkish Emperor...” is "probably a report from an eyewitness. It tells of a rumor that was spread in Hungary and Austria that the Pope and Venice had initiated this campaign. The atrocities of war are reported in detail." (Göllner, Turcica 254) At the end there is a list of noble fallen Hungarians and Bohemians.

The title woodcut shows Turkish troops massacring people in a market square, while the city burns around them. To a sense of pathos and horror, the artist has depicted a mother wielding a sword to protect her small children, who clutch at her dress. The full-page woodcut on the final leaf shows Turkish soldiers murdering children. The market square massacre woodcut would later be reused to illustrate an account of the Ottoman occupation of Buda (1541).

“The Battle of Mohács (August 29, 1526) was waged between Hungarian forces led by King Louis II and the invading Ottoman forces led by Sultan Süleyman the Magnificent. The battle marked the effective destruction of the Hungarian monarchy and paved the way for Habsburg and Turkish domination in Hungary.

“In order to expand the Ottoman Empire into the heart of Europe, Süleyman realized that he would have to conquer the kingdom of Hungary. The first stage to achieving this goal was the capture of Belgrade (which he accomplished in 1521), allowing Süleyman to use Serbian territory to launch an invasion.”(Britannica)

Rather than move further into Europe, Süleyman turned to matters in the Mediterranean, where he spent 1522 laying siege to Rhodes, conquering the island in 1523. In the spring of 1526, Süleyman turned once again to Hungary.

“The Hungarians knew that an attack was coming but could not win any support from other Christian powers. Süleyman’s army made an uncontested crossing of the Drava River on a pontoon bridge, which took five days, while King Louis waited to face the invaders on a large marshy plain at Mohács. The Hungarians intended to rely upon the shock effect of their charging armored knights, but Süleyman had better balanced forces, including infantry Janissaries armed with arquebuses, sipahi light cavalry, and formidable banks of cannon.

“The charge of the Hungarian cavalry caused serious casualties to the Ottoman vanguard, but Süleyman’s elite Janissaries pushed back the Hungarians, who were also torn apart by Turkish cannon fire. As the Hungarians fell back, they were outflanked and encircled by the fast-moving Ottoman light cavalry. The Hungarian force was annihilated. King Louis of Hungary was thrown from his horse and killed as he tried to escape the carnage. Süleyman proceeded into Buda (September 10) but then withdrew from the country, taking more than 100,000 captives with him.

“The defeat at Mohacs was a disaster that ended the existence of Hungary as an independent united kingdom . A prolonged civil war (1526-38) ultimately resulted in the incorporation of the central and southern two-thirds of Hungary into the Ottoman Empire (1547) and in the establishment of Transylvania and the eastern Hungarian provinces as an autonomous principality within the Ottoman Empire.

“The Ottoman losses amounted to 2,000 out of an army of 60,000; the Hungarian, 18,000 of 35,000.”(Britannica).

VD 16 B5794; Kertbeny 261; See Apponyi, “Bibliotheca Apponyiana” 188 f. and Göllner 254 (variant)