Item #4939 Guydos questions: newly corrected. VVherevnto is added the thirde and fourth booke of Galen, with a treatise for the helps of all the outward parts of mans body. And also an excellent antidotary containing diuers receipts, as well of auncient as latter wryters: faythfully corrected by men skilfull in the sayd arte. Guy de MEDICINE. SURGERY. Chauliac, George Baker, William Clowes, Robert Copland, Galen, 1543/4–1604, fl., Guido de Cauliaco, Claudius Galenus.
Guydos questions: newly corrected. VVherevnto is added the thirde and fourth booke of Galen, with a treatise for the helps of all the outward parts of mans body. And also an excellent antidotary containing diuers receipts, as well of auncient as latter wryters: faythfully corrected by men skilfull in the sayd arte.
Guydos questions: newly corrected. VVherevnto is added the thirde and fourth booke of Galen, with a treatise for the helps of all the outward parts of mans body. And also an excellent antidotary containing diuers receipts, as well of auncient as latter wryters: faythfully corrected by men skilfull in the sayd arte.
Guydos questions: newly corrected. VVherevnto is added the thirde and fourth booke of Galen, with a treatise for the helps of all the outward parts of mans body. And also an excellent antidotary containing diuers receipts, as well of auncient as latter wryters: faythfully corrected by men skilfull in the sayd arte.
Guydos questions: newly corrected. VVherevnto is added the thirde and fourth booke of Galen, with a treatise for the helps of all the outward parts of mans body. And also an excellent antidotary containing diuers receipts, as well of auncient as latter wryters: faythfully corrected by men skilfull in the sayd arte.
Guydos questions: newly corrected. VVherevnto is added the thirde and fourth booke of Galen, with a treatise for the helps of all the outward parts of mans body. And also an excellent antidotary containing diuers receipts, as well of auncient as latter wryters: faythfully corrected by men skilfull in the sayd arte.
Guydos questions: newly corrected. VVherevnto is added the thirde and fourth booke of Galen, with a treatise for the helps of all the outward parts of mans body. And also an excellent antidotary containing diuers receipts, as well of auncient as latter wryters: faythfully corrected by men skilfull in the sayd arte.
Guydos questions: newly corrected. VVherevnto is added the thirde and fourth booke of Galen, with a treatise for the helps of all the outward parts of mans body. And also an excellent antidotary containing diuers receipts, as well of auncient as latter wryters: faythfully corrected by men skilfull in the sayd arte.

Guydos questions: newly corrected. VVherevnto is added the thirde and fourth booke of Galen, with a treatise for the helps of all the outward parts of mans body. And also an excellent antidotary containing diuers receipts, as well of auncient as latter wryters: faythfully corrected by men skilfull in the sayd arte.

London: By Thomas East, 1579.

Price: $9,500.00

Quarto: 18.4 x 12.2 cm.. [4], 188, 190-201 leaves. A-Z4, Aa-Zz4, Aaa-Eee4. Complete

FIRST EDITION.

Bound in 19th c. half-leather and marbled paper over boards (joints, extremities, and paper worn, spine just starting at foot), spine tooled in blind and with Greek key pattern, gilt, at head and foot. Internally a near fine copy (title a little dusty and with a very light dampstain to the outer margin, a few sidenotes just touched by the binder’s plough. There are a few instances of early manuscript annotations, which have been shaved. Small stain on p. 91. Final leaf dusty, small holes in the gutter and outer margin strengthened with later paper; small nicks to lower corner of a handful of leaves. With a woodcut device on the title page, armorial woodcut on the final leaf, and an elaborate, 13-line woodcut initial on the second leaf.

A rare collection of ancient, medieval, and renaissance surgical and medical texts, variously translated, edited, and corrected by George Baker, surgeon to Queen Elizabeth I. The book is largely a revision of Robert Copland’s 1542 "The questyonary of cyrurgyens". The diversity of sources collected here reflects the growing influence of continental medicine on medical practice in Renaissance England. Included in this book are:

1. Baker’s revision of Robert Copland’s 1542 translation of Guy de Chauliac’s landmark medieval surgical text, "Chirurgia magna".
2. Baker’s epitome of Book 3 of Galen’s “De compositione medicamentorum per genera" (“On the Composition of Medications according to Type”).
3. Baker’s adaptation of Copland’s 1542 translation of Book 4 of Galen’s "De methodo medendi" (“On the Method of Healing”).
4. An antidotary assembled from various sources, with contributions by William Clowes, with whom Baker had a contentious relationship (see below.)

George Baker (1540-1612)

“Baker was admitted to the Company of the Barber–Surgeons in the 1560s and was appointed sergeant–surgeon to the queen in 1592. In 1597 Baker wrote an eloquent and learned preface to John Gerard's ‘The Herball, or, Generall Historie of Plantes’.

“Baker considered himself a Galenist who thought it opportune to warn against the harm done by empirics and Paracelsians, but he none the less kept an open mind about chemical medicine. In editing the works of Galen and Guy de Chauliac, Baker gave ample evidence that he did not envisage a break with traditional medicine. Yet despite his commitment to the past his new orientation towards chemical medicine seems to have incurred the disapproval of the College of Physicians. He was denounced, together with his colleague John Banister, as a surgeon guilty of illegal medicine.

Baker & William Clowes:

“Baker was quick-tempered and violent. In 1557 he fell out with his colleague William Clowes . . . and challenged him to a duel. The master (of the Barber–Surgeons' Company), wardens, and assistants intervened and, wishing that the two hotspurs 'might be and continewe loving brothers'. The two did comply with the company's wish, making up for their gross misdemeanour by each editing a work of the other in 1579.” [ODNB]

Guy de Chauliac (c. 1300—1368)

Guy “was the most eminent surgeon of the European Middle Ages, whose “Chirurgia magna” (1363) was a standard work on surgery until at least the 17th century. In this work he describes a narcotic inhalation used as a soporific for surgical patients, as well as numerous surgical procedures, including those for hernia and cataract, which had previously been treated mainly by charlatans. The greater part of his life was spent at Avignon, where he was physician to Pope Clement VI and two of his successors. He was among the first to describe two different types of plague, pneumonic and bubonic, both of which had occurred in outbreaks in Avignon.” [Britannica]

Galen (129- ca. 216)

The Greek physician and philosopher Galen exercised a dominant influence on medical theory and practice in Europe from the Antiquity until the mid-17th century (Britannica). His “De methodo medendi” “offers the most sustained account of Galen’s attitude toward medical theory and practice, embracing not only a whole range of varied diseases but also the philosophical arguments and presuppositions that in Galen’s view should govern the doctor’s therapeutic activities.”(Kudlein and Durling)

Book III, translated here as “The Method of Curation of the Wounds of Nerves or Sinewes” reflects Galen’s interest in anatomy, which he believed to be the foundation of all medical knowledge, and his advanced knowledge of the nervous system, which he developed through dissection: “He distinguished seven pairs of cranial nerves, described the valves of the heart, and observed the structural differences between arteries and veins. One of his most important demonstrations was that the arteries carry blood, not air, as had been taught for 400 years. Notable also were his vivisection experiments, such as tying off the recurrent laryngeal nerve to show that the brain controls the voice, performing a series of transections of the spinal cord to establish the functions of the spinal nerves, and tying off the ureters to demonstrate kidney and bladder functions.

Robert Copland (fl. 1505–1547)

Copland was a “translator and printer, and began his career in Wynkyn de Worde's shop. For about a decade before he began work as a printer Copland translated French light reading which de Worde published.

“Copland many times showed himself acutely aware of early printing's technical concerns as it attempted to accommodate its inheritance from a manuscript tradition. He served as de Worde's corrector for ‘Ipomydon’ in 1518 ('Syth that no wryter / wolde take it to amende'), and, as William Herbert noted, he was the first printer to use the comma in addition to the virgule (early January 1534, in Erasmus's ‘Funus’ and John Colet's ‘A Ryght Fruteful Monycion’). He warns printers against overzealous changes:
Correccyon
I agre
but there a pause, Folowe your copy
and lette thamendynge alone.

“Most tellingly, he printed Chaucer's ‘Parliament of Fowls’ from manuscript rather than depending primarily on an earlier edition, claiming that in so doing he had 'losed' the text from 'ruynous domage', amended the poetry to 'thylke same langage that Chaucer to the gave', and thus made it possible for lovers of Chaucer to 'his mynde avewe'.” [ODNB].

STC 12469. See Whitty, “British Books and Books Published in English Related to Medicine, 1475-1640: A Handlist of Identified Works”.