Item #4874 A declaration of the practises & treasons attempted and committed by Robert late Earle of Essex and his complices, against her Maiestie and her kingdoms, and of the proceedings as well at the arraignments & conuictions of the said late Earle, and his adherents, as after: together with the very confessions and other parts of the euidences themselues, word for word taken out of the originals. Francis Bacon, Lord Verulam, Robert Devereux Essex, Earl of.
A declaration of the practises & treasons attempted and committed by Robert late Earle of Essex and his complices, against her Maiestie and her kingdoms, and of the proceedings as well at the arraignments & conuictions of the said late Earle, and his adherents, as after: together with the very confessions and other parts of the euidences themselues, word for word taken out of the originals.
A declaration of the practises & treasons attempted and committed by Robert late Earle of Essex and his complices, against her Maiestie and her kingdoms, and of the proceedings as well at the arraignments & conuictions of the said late Earle, and his adherents, as after: together with the very confessions and other parts of the euidences themselues, word for word taken out of the originals.
A declaration of the practises & treasons attempted and committed by Robert late Earle of Essex and his complices, against her Maiestie and her kingdoms, and of the proceedings as well at the arraignments & conuictions of the said late Earle, and his adherents, as after: together with the very confessions and other parts of the euidences themselues, word for word taken out of the originals.
A declaration of the practises & treasons attempted and committed by Robert late Earle of Essex and his complices, against her Maiestie and her kingdoms, and of the proceedings as well at the arraignments & conuictions of the said late Earle, and his adherents, as after: together with the very confessions and other parts of the euidences themselues, word for word taken out of the originals.
A declaration of the practises & treasons attempted and committed by Robert late Earle of Essex and his complices, against her Maiestie and her kingdoms, and of the proceedings as well at the arraignments & conuictions of the said late Earle, and his adherents, as after: together with the very confessions and other parts of the euidences themselues, word for word taken out of the originals.
A declaration of the practises & treasons attempted and committed by Robert late Earle of Essex and his complices, against her Maiestie and her kingdoms, and of the proceedings as well at the arraignments & conuictions of the said late Earle, and his adherents, as after: together with the very confessions and other parts of the euidences themselues, word for word taken out of the originals.

A declaration of the practises & treasons attempted and committed by Robert late Earle of Essex and his complices, against her Maiestie and her kingdoms, and of the proceedings as well at the arraignments & conuictions of the said late Earle, and his adherents, as after: together with the very confessions and other parts of the euidences themselues, word for word taken out of the originals.

London: by Robert Barker, printer to the Queenes most excellent Maiestie, 1601.

Price: $6,800.00

Quarto: 17.6 x 12.9 cm. [128] pp. A-Q4 (complete with l. A1)

FIRST EDITION.

Bound in 20th c. crushed red Morocco, title tooled in gold on the spine. A fine copy. First leaf lightly soiled, small dampstain to outer margin of first 7 leaves, very slim and short worm-trail in upper margin of closing gatherings, verso of final leaf dusty and with light crease. ¾ page woodcut royal arms on verso of title and twice again in the text. Provenance: 18th c. signature (Hayes, 1780) on title; bookplate of William Foyle (1885-1963) (“W. A. Foyle, Beeleigh Abbey.”).

Complete with leaf A1, blank aside from a signature mark “A.j” According to a note in the Halliwell-Phillips copy (Folger) only two other copies with this leaf are extant. In the U.S., ESTC locates Folger, Harvard, Huntington, Newberry, Yale, Texas, Kansas.

An official account of the trial, for treason, of the soldier-statesman Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex (1565-1601), who had been Queen Elizabeth’s favorite for more than a decade. In 1600, after a disastrous military campaign in Ireland, Essex, fearing for his position at court, marched on London in open rebellion. However, the popular support that Essex had expected failed to materialize, and Essex and his supporters withdrew to Essex’s estate at Wanstead. Besieged by his enemies loyal to Elizabeth, Essex surrendered. He was imprisoned in the Tower, was tried and condemned for treason, and on 25 February, was executed in the courtyard of the Tower. Before he was beheaded, Essex ‘Humbly thanked her majesty , that he should die in so private a manner, lest the acclamation of the people might have been a temptation unto him.”

The Account of the Trial:

Throughout the 1590’s Francis Bacon and Devereux shared a strong personal friendship and worked on each other’s behalf in matters of career and state. When Essex returned in disgrace from Ireland in 1599, Bacon lobbied Queen Elizabeth unsuccessfully to deal with her favorite in private rather than in Star Chamber. However, when Essex “made his forlorn attempt at rebellion”, his cause was lost.

“At the trial that followed the queen made use of Bacon for the prosecution. When Essex accused Bacon of being an accomplice because he had written letters for Essex, Bacon retorted: ‘I have spent more time in vain in studying how to make the earl a good servant to the Queen, than I have done in anything else’ (Jardine and Stewart, 244). Bacon was also commissioned to prosecute some of Essex's followers, and the queen called upon him to write the official account of the trial.” In 1604, in the early days of James I’s reign, Bacon published a defense of his own part in the trial, writing “that the queen and the public service had always had his first priority: ‘whatsoever I did … was done in my duty and service to the Queen and the State’ (Works, 10.141).”(ODNB)

The book includes affidavits and confessions from those privy to Essex’s words and actions during the campaign in Ireland and upon his return to England. It concludes with an abstract of Essex’s own written confession and a second confession made by him before three ministers just prior to his execution, already quoted above. “He publicly, in his prayer and protestation, as also privately, aggravated the detestation of his offence; and especially hearing of them that were present at the execution, he exaggerated it with foure epithets, desiring God to forgive him his great, his bloody, his crying, and infectious sin; which word ‘infectious’ he explained to us, that it was a leprosy that had infected far and wide.”(l. Q4r recto).

STC (2nd ed.), 1133; Gibson, Bacon, 63; Pforzheimer, 26