Item #4871 “A Collection of Divers Speeches in the Starrchamber” [COMPRISING] Speeches Delivered in the Starrchamber, the xxixth of November, 1599: the Lord Keeper: the Lord Treasurer… [WITH] A Collection off Speeches in the Starrchamber touchinge the Trayterous Conspiracyes, of the Earle of Essex, and other his Complices, delyvered on fridaye the xiiith of february Anno 1600… [WITH] A Speech Delivered by Sir Rob[er]t Cecill, Secretarye, in the Starrchamber the [blank space] february Anno 1600. Robert REBELLION. Cecil, Earl of Salisbury Secretary of State.
“A Collection of Divers Speeches in the Starrchamber” [COMPRISING] Speeches Delivered in the Starrchamber, the xxixth of November, 1599: the Lord Keeper: the Lord Treasurer… [WITH] A Collection off Speeches in the Starrchamber touchinge the Trayterous Conspiracyes, of the Earle of Essex, and other his Complices, delyvered on fridaye the xiiith of february Anno 1600… [WITH] A Speech Delivered by Sir Rob[er]t Cecill, Secretarye, in the Starrchamber the [blank space] february Anno 1600.
“A Collection of Divers Speeches in the Starrchamber” [COMPRISING] Speeches Delivered in the Starrchamber, the xxixth of November, 1599: the Lord Keeper: the Lord Treasurer… [WITH] A Collection off Speeches in the Starrchamber touchinge the Trayterous Conspiracyes, of the Earle of Essex, and other his Complices, delyvered on fridaye the xiiith of february Anno 1600… [WITH] A Speech Delivered by Sir Rob[er]t Cecill, Secretarye, in the Starrchamber the [blank space] february Anno 1600.
“A Collection of Divers Speeches in the Starrchamber” [COMPRISING] Speeches Delivered in the Starrchamber, the xxixth of November, 1599: the Lord Keeper: the Lord Treasurer… [WITH] A Collection off Speeches in the Starrchamber touchinge the Trayterous Conspiracyes, of the Earle of Essex, and other his Complices, delyvered on fridaye the xiiith of february Anno 1600… [WITH] A Speech Delivered by Sir Rob[er]t Cecill, Secretarye, in the Starrchamber the [blank space] february Anno 1600.
“A Collection of Divers Speeches in the Starrchamber” [COMPRISING] Speeches Delivered in the Starrchamber, the xxixth of November, 1599: the Lord Keeper: the Lord Treasurer… [WITH] A Collection off Speeches in the Starrchamber touchinge the Trayterous Conspiracyes, of the Earle of Essex, and other his Complices, delyvered on fridaye the xiiith of february Anno 1600… [WITH] A Speech Delivered by Sir Rob[er]t Cecill, Secretarye, in the Starrchamber the [blank space] february Anno 1600.
“A Collection of Divers Speeches in the Starrchamber” [COMPRISING] Speeches Delivered in the Starrchamber, the xxixth of November, 1599: the Lord Keeper: the Lord Treasurer… [WITH] A Collection off Speeches in the Starrchamber touchinge the Trayterous Conspiracyes, of the Earle of Essex, and other his Complices, delyvered on fridaye the xiiith of february Anno 1600… [WITH] A Speech Delivered by Sir Rob[er]t Cecill, Secretarye, in the Starrchamber the [blank space] february Anno 1600.

“A Collection of Divers Speeches in the Starrchamber” [COMPRISING] Speeches Delivered in the Starrchamber, the xxixth of November, 1599: the Lord Keeper: the Lord Treasurer… [WITH] A Collection off Speeches in the Starrchamber touchinge the Trayterous Conspiracyes, of the Earle of Essex, and other his Complices, delyvered on fridaye the xiiith of february Anno 1600… [WITH] A Speech Delivered by Sir Rob[er]t Cecill, Secretarye, in the Starrchamber the [blank space] february Anno 1600.

Manuscript on paper. [England] ca. 1620.

Price: $15,000.00

Folio: 26.5 x 19 cm. [32] p. of text, the first with the title “A Collection of Divers Speeches in the Starrchamber”, and 1 final blank leaf.

Once part of a larger volume of 16th and 17th c. state papers (see description below), now dispersed. Original sewing preserved, housed in a quarter Morocco slip-case, with the W. A. Foyle, Beeleigh Abbey bookplate. Text written in an accomplished secretarial hand. The manuscript is in fine condition with some light soiling, a few light stains, and a few short tears.

An extraordinary manuscript collection of speeches made in the Star Chamber by members of the Privy Council in 1599 and 1601, accusing Queen Elizabeth’s favorite, Robert Devereaux (1565–1601), second Earl of Essex, of disobeying orders, mounting an insurrection, and conspiring with Irish rebels to make himself King. Essex was executed less than two weeks after the 1601 speeches were given.

The 1599 speeches were made 29 November, following Essex’ arrest for returning from Ireland without the Queen’s permission. The 1601 speeches were made 13 February in response to Essex’ Rebellion, in which he marched on London with a group of armed supporters on 8 February. The final speech was made by Essex’ chief accuser, Secretary of State Robert Cecil, in February 1601, on or about the 13th.

Essex and Queen Elizabeth had a famously tempestuous relationship. In 1598 she appointed him Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, with orders to crush the rebellion led by Hugh O'Neill, Earl of Tyrone. When Essex’ forces met the Irish rebels, Essex breached protocol by meeting privately with Tyrone, and then negotiated a truce the Queen and counselors considered most-unsatisfactory.

The 1599 speeches describe Essex’ mission in Ireland and criticize him for disobeying orders, holding a private meeting with Tyrone, returning to England against the Queen’s orders, and entering her bedchamber without permission.

Secretary of State Robert Cecil summarized the case against Essex:

“The traytor Essex came from Ireland, so unexpected, with full purpose and intent, to remove some from the Queene as he misliked and could not bend to his trayterous faction. And that Tyron and he could joyne their forces, and by destroying her, within one minute afterwards, Essex to bee made sole Kinge of England” (leaf 12r)

The Lord Treasurer describes the substantial matériel requisitioned for the mission. Essex’ aid, “appoynted by the Earle of Essex himself, demanded this: 1,200 footman, and 1,000 horse”, later increased to “1,600 footman and 1,500 horse”. There are also demands for “ordnance”, “100 last of powder”, “1,300 suites of Apparral.” (5v, 6r)

The most serious charge made by the counselors regarded Essex private parley with the Earl of Tyrone, which led to suspicion that he was conspiring with the Irish to overthrow the Queen. “Such a private conference by the Queen's representative was a highly irregular procedure in Tudor England, or in any diplomatic circle. Since no witness record was kept of the proceedings, the meeting was the subject of much speculation among the Lord Lieutenant's friends and enemies.” (“The Campaign of Essex in Ireland, 1599” Robert E. Morris, p. 237)

As punishment for his offences, “Essex was sequestered from all his offices and ordered to remain under house arrest. He was finally granted his liberty on 26 August 1600, but his release prohibited him from going to court, which meant that his political career was finished—and that his enemies were determined to prevent him from using his old charm to regain favour with the queen. However, Essex's huge debts meant that he simply could not afford to retire.

“Essex House became a center for disaffected aristocrats, unemployed army officers, and noisy puritan preaching. On the morning of Sunday 8 February 1601, three councilors and the earl of Worcester arrived at Essex House to demand an explanation (for his activities). Although all four men were well disposed towards him, Essex had them locked up.

“He then led about 300 men on a march into the City, wearing swords and doublets, but no armour, and carrying few firearms. Essex's companions included the earls of Southampton, Bedford, and Rutland, lords Cromwell, Sandys, and Mounteagle, Sir Charles Danvers, Sir Christopher Blount, and two brothers of the earl of Northumberland. Calling for help from the citizens as they walked, Essex's procession arrived at the house of Sir Thomas Smythe, sheriff of London, about midday. However, Smythe proved evasive and all hope of City support quickly disappeared. Indeed, the lord mayor ordered the gates shut, and troops loyal to enemies of Essex, such as Thomas Cecil, second Lord Burghley, began to surround the demonstrators. By 3 p.m., with fewer than 100 men remaining by his side, Essex headed back to Essex House. Stiff opposition at Ludgate forced him to take to the river and only a hard core managed to reach Essex House, where they were promptly besieged by troops commanded by the lord admiral. Two cannon arrived from the Tower about 9 p.m. and Essex finally decided to surrender. He spent the night as a prisoner in Lambeth Palace before being moved to the Tower in the morning. Scores of his followers were also arrested.”(ODNB)

The 1601 speeches were made in the Star Chamber on 13 February, following Essex’ arrest and imprisonment in the Tower. The counselors attacked Essex for the rebellion and his suspected conspiracy with Tyrone and the Irish rebels. Cecil described a plot that included an invasion by “Tyron with 8000 men”(13r) with the intent of overthrowing the Queen.

In addition to Essex’ conspiracy with Tyrone, the counselors also addressed the case of Thomas Lee, who was arrested on 12 February after breaking into the Queen’s private quarters in an attempt to convince her to release Essex. The manuscript quotes Lord Keeper Egerton:

“Captain Thomas Lea, having had conferences with Tyrone in companye with that arch traytor Essex . . . dealt with diverse other devilish disposed people to surprise Her Majesty upon her privy chamber door . . . and was by Lea himself upon examination confessed” (10r)

On 19 February Essex was “tried for treason at Westminster Hall. By then the council had uncovered information about the plotting of the last few months. The trial generated enormous interest. For the prosecution Sir Edward Coke delivered a typically bullying performance. Essex defended himself energetically, but the result was a foregone conclusion and the Earl was condemned to death. Essex was beheaded before a small audience in the courtyard of the Tower on 25 February 1601.”(ODNB)

This manuscript was once included in a 17th c. collection of manuscripts of State Papers, now dispersed,that also had manuscript copies of “A Letter wrytten by Sr: Phillipp Sidnye to Queene Elizabeth” on her proposed marriage to the Duke of Anjou, and a speech by King James I, “Kinge James his Speeche in Parliamte concerninge the Unyon Betwixt England, and Scotland.”

CONTENTS:

PART I
Egerton, Thomas (1540-1617) Lord Keeper of the Great Seal of England, Viscount Brackley.
Sackville, Thomas (1536-1608) Lord High Treasurer, Baron Buckhurst.
Howard, Charles (1536-1624) Lord Admiral, Earl of Nottingham.
Carey, George (1547-1603) Lord Chamberlain, Baron Hunsdon.
North, Roger (1530-1600) Comptroller of the Household. Baron North
Cecil, Robert (1563-1612) Secretary of State, Earl of Salisbury.

Speeches Delivered in the Starrchamber, the xxixth of November, 1599: the Lord Keeper: the Lord Treasurer: The Earle of Nottingham, the Lord Chamberleyne, the Lord North: Mr. Comptroller, and Mr. Secretarye Cecill.

PART II
Egerton, Thomas (1540-1617) Lord Keeper of the Great Seal of England, Viscount Brackley.
Howard, Charles (1536-1624) Lord Admiral, Earl of Nottingham.
Knollys, Sir William (1544-1632) Controller of the Household, Earl of Banbury.
Cecil, Robert (1563-1612) Secretary of State, Earl of Salisbury.

A Collection off Speeches in the Starrchamber touchinge the Trayterous Conspiracyes, of the Earle of Essex, and other his Complices, delyvered on fridaye the xiiith of ffebruary Anno 1600: in open Corte: By the Lord Keeper, The Lord Admyrall Sr Willm Knowles and Sr Robte Cecill.

PART III
Cecil, Robert (1563-1612) Secretary of State, Earl of Salisbury.

A Speech Deliered by Sir Robte Cecill, Secretarye, in the Starrchamber the [blank] february Anno 1600.