Item #4675 Barnabees Journall, Under the Names of Mirtilus & Faustulus shadowed: for the Travellers Solace lately published, to most apt numbers reduced, and to the old Tune of Barnabe commonly chanted. By Corymboeus. The oyle of malt and juyce of spritely nectar Have made my Muse more valiant than Hector. Richard Brathwait, 1588?-1673.
Barnabees Journall, Under the Names of Mirtilus & Faustulus shadowed: for the Travellers Solace lately published, to most apt numbers reduced, and to the old Tune of Barnabe commonly chanted. By Corymboeus. The oyle of malt and juyce of spritely nectar Have made my Muse more valiant than Hector.
Barnabees Journall, Under the Names of Mirtilus & Faustulus shadowed: for the Travellers Solace lately published, to most apt numbers reduced, and to the old Tune of Barnabe commonly chanted. By Corymboeus. The oyle of malt and juyce of spritely nectar Have made my Muse more valiant than Hector.
Barnabees Journall, Under the Names of Mirtilus & Faustulus shadowed: for the Travellers Solace lately published, to most apt numbers reduced, and to the old Tune of Barnabe commonly chanted. By Corymboeus. The oyle of malt and juyce of spritely nectar Have made my Muse more valiant than Hector.
Barnabees Journall, Under the Names of Mirtilus & Faustulus shadowed: for the Travellers Solace lately published, to most apt numbers reduced, and to the old Tune of Barnabe commonly chanted. By Corymboeus. The oyle of malt and juyce of spritely nectar Have made my Muse more valiant than Hector.
Barnabees Journall, Under the Names of Mirtilus & Faustulus shadowed: for the Travellers Solace lately published, to most apt numbers reduced, and to the old Tune of Barnabe commonly chanted. By Corymboeus. The oyle of malt and juyce of spritely nectar Have made my Muse more valiant than Hector.
Barnabees Journall, Under the Names of Mirtilus & Faustulus shadowed: for the Travellers Solace lately published, to most apt numbers reduced, and to the old Tune of Barnabe commonly chanted. By Corymboeus. The oyle of malt and juyce of spritely nectar Have made my Muse more valiant than Hector.
Barnabees Journall, Under the Names of Mirtilus & Faustulus shadowed: for the Travellers Solace lately published, to most apt numbers reduced, and to the old Tune of Barnabe commonly chanted. By Corymboeus. The oyle of malt and juyce of spritely nectar Have made my Muse more valiant than Hector.

Barnabees Journall, Under the Names of Mirtilus & Faustulus shadowed: for the Travellers Solace lately published, to most apt numbers reduced, and to the old Tune of Barnabe commonly chanted. By Corymboeus. The oyle of malt and juyce of spritely nectar Have made my Muse more valiant than Hector.

London: John Haviland, 1638.

Price: $15,000.00

16mo in 8's: 10.5 x 7.9 cm. (π1), A-Z8, Aa-Ee8 . Complete with the engraved frontispiece (π1).

FIRST EDITION IN ENGLISH and FIRST COMPLETE EDITION.

A COMPLETE COPY with the often-missing engraved frontispiece by William Marshall. Bound in late 19th c. tan morocco, gilt edges and turn-ins. A very good copy, washed and pressed, contents lightly toned, engraved t.p. soiled and with slightly ragged fore-edge, discreet restoration to printed t.p. Leaves X7-8 trimmed close at head shaving the ornament, very minor marginal repair to leaf 2A5. No other edition appeared until 1716 and that in an altered form. This edition of 1638 is the only true edition.

First edition of this unusual travelogue, in which “the theme of drunkenness and bawdiness is played out in what perhaps amounts to the world’s most celebrated pub crawl.”(Bowes) The titular character makes his way from town to town engaging in sexual escapades and multi-day benders.

Whether surrounded by thieves or threatened by bears (!), he continues his drunken escapades without fear (“No feare affrights deep drinkers”), with the alcohol providing a false sense of bravery and the alcoholism driving him on recklessly (although the experience with the bears does make him ‘wrong his bretches’). It is when his morality fails him that his instinct for self-preservation does seem to kick in, as when he skips town worried that he has impregnated his most recent sexual conquest.

‘Hence to Mansfield, where I knew one,/ That was comely, and a trew one,/ With her nak’d compact made I,/ Her long lov’d I, with her laid I,/Towne and her I left, being doubtfull/Lest my love had made her fruitful.”

“Richard Brathwait's most famous work is ‘Barnabees Journall’ (1638), written in English and Latin rhyme. The title-page says it is written for the ‘travellers' solace’ and is to be chanted to the old tune of ‘Barnabe.’ The story of ‘drunken Barnabee's’ four journeys to the north of England contains much amusing topographical information, and its gaiety is unflagging. Barnabee rarely visits a town or village without some notice of an excellent inn or a charming hostess.”(EB)
“After trying his hand at essays and characters, Richard Brathwait chose to devote his learning and Goliardic humor to the narration of a voyage. Adopting the name of a proverbial drunkard, he described a pilgrimage through the towns and villages of England. Occasionally, he notes local peculiarities; but the story, mostly, is a record of the vagabond's escapades, which sometimes meet a vagabond's condign punishment. The book is a triumph of easy rhythmic verse." (Cambridge History of English Literature, vol. iv, page 412)

"There are many amusing bits, for in his perambulation of provincial England the normally moralistic author becomes an irresponsible and jovial Bacchus, and every other public-house has a casual Ariadne. The jogging journal is better than any of Taylor's travelogues- and a world away from Poly-Olbion." (Quoted from English Literature in the Earlier Seventeenth Century by D. Bush, page 47)

There is also a bit of Shakespeariana in Barnabee, as he mentions the phrase 'As you like it,' suggesting thereby that it was of common usage, and served as a titular parallel to 'Much Ado About Nothing,' of the bard's pen. Here is the section in question.

A shop neighbouring neare Iacco,/ Where Young vends his old Tobacco,/ 'As you like it' sometimes sealed/ Which Impression since repealed,/ 'As you make it,' he will have it/ And in Chart and Front engrave it."

STC 3556. North American copies: F(imperfect), HN, HD, N, NY + UCLA, IL, Princeton, Ransom; Grolier Club Wither to Prior #77; Hoe Catalogue (1903) Vol I, p. 119-120; Huth Catalogue (1880) Vol I, p. 201

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