Item #4622 M.T.C. Tusculane questiones cum commento Philippi Beroaldi. Marcus Tullius Cicero, Filippo Beroaldo, the Elder, B C.
M.T.C. Tusculane questiones cum commento Philippi Beroaldi.
M.T.C. Tusculane questiones cum commento Philippi Beroaldi.
M.T.C. Tusculane questiones cum commento Philippi Beroaldi.
M.T.C. Tusculane questiones cum commento Philippi Beroaldi.
M.T.C. Tusculane questiones cum commento Philippi Beroaldi.
M.T.C. Tusculane questiones cum commento Philippi Beroaldi.
M.T.C. Tusculane questiones cum commento Philippi Beroaldi.
M.T.C. Tusculane questiones cum commento Philippi Beroaldi.
M.T.C. Tusculane questiones cum commento Philippi Beroaldi.
M.T.C. Tusculane questiones cum commento Philippi Beroaldi.
M.T.C. Tusculane questiones cum commento Philippi Beroaldi.
M.T.C. Tusculane questiones cum commento Philippi Beroaldi.
M.T.C. Tusculane questiones cum commento Philippi Beroaldi.

M.T.C. Tusculane questiones cum commento Philippi Beroaldi.

Venice: a Philippo Pincio Mantuano Impressae, 27 September, 1510.

Price: $7,400.00

Folio: 31.2 x 21.3 cm. CXIII lvs. Collation: a-t6 (-blank leaf t6)

A fine copy bound in contemporary wooden boards (corners chipped) with later blind-ruled half-calf calf, with leather straps, catch-plates, and clasps preserved (one clasp defective). A broad-margined, bright copy with minor blemishes: title page lightly stained, light marginal dampstain to outer margin of opening and final gathering, a few pin-prick wormholes, lvs. G3-4 and M6 toned. With contemporary marginal annotations scattered throughout. Illustrated with a title page woodcut scene showing the author and scribes writing diligently, and five woodcuts in the text.

An attractive, illustrated edition of one of Cicero’s most important treatments of ethical questions, with the commentary of the great Renaissance humanist Filippo Beroaldo the Elder.

“The Tusculan Disputations is one of Cicero's greatest philosophical works and certainly the most passionate of them. Like his ‘On Moral Ends’, ‘Tusculan Disputations’ is dedicated to Marcus Junius Brutus (destined to become the most famous of Caesar’s assassins) and set in Cicero's villa at Tusculum, whence the title. The work, which marks Cicero's closest approach to the theories of the most rigorous Stoicism, is conducted in the form of a dialogue between Cicero and an anonymous interlocutor and so becomes almost an interior monologue.

“The five individual books deal, respectively, with the themes of death, grief, sadness, spiritual disturbances, and virtue as the guarantee of happiness. We thus have here a great summa of ancient ethics, a vast essay on the subject of happiness. In the Tusculans Cicero seeks an answer to his own personal questions too, a solution for his doubts; hence the author's profound emotional participation in the subjects treated, which gives the style a passionate solemnity and bestows on certain pages a lyrical intensity but rarely equaled in Latin prose.

“In his youth Cicero had attended the lectures of the most diverse philosophers, and he continued to be interested in philosophy practically throughout his life. Yet he began to write philosophy only in 46, with the small work Paradoxes of the Stoics, dedicated to Marcus Brutus, which expounds the Stoic theories most contrary to ordinary opinion. Then in 45 philosophical works come from him one after the other, at an almost incredible rate of production, and this at the same time as the most grievous events in Cicero's life. In February of that year his daughter Tullia died, and to relieve his intense grief he wrote a Consolatio, which is lost. But private events were not the only ones pushing him towards philosophy: the dictatorship of Caesar had deprived him of any possibility of participating in public affairs. Now almost indifferent to political events, Cicero lived in isolation and buried himself completely in composing his philosophical works…

“The aim of Cicero’s philosophical works is the same one that inspires some of his most important speeches: to provide a solid intellectual, ethical, political base for a dominant class whose need for order would not be translated into obtuse isolation and whose respect for the national tradition (mos maiorum) would not hinder the absorption of Greek culture, a dominant class that, though it performed the duties owed to the state, would not become insensitive either to the pleasures of an otium filled with art and literature or to the pleasures of that courteously refined style of life that is summed up in the term humanitas, that consciousness of culture that is the fruit of civilization, the capacity to distinguish and to appreciate what is beautiful and fitting.

“In this sense a great part of Cicero's work can be read as the search for a difficult balance between modernization and the necessity of preserving traditional values. Behind the intellectual activity of Cicero one perceives a society pervaded by contrasting drives that are often destructive: the influx of wealth from the conquered countries long ago made the rigid morality of the early days a hopeless anachronism, yet the swift abandonment of the virtues and values that had brought about Rome's greatness was now calling into question the very survival of the republican state.”(Conte).

Censimento Edit 16 CNCE 12179. Sander 1983. Essling 1684. Not in BMSTC (Italian) or Adams. Panzer. Vol. VIII. Pag. 401. H. 521. 3 copies located in North America: Trinity, Illinois, Williams.