Item #4580 Quae in toto Opere continentur. L. Apuleii Madaurensis. Metamorphoseon sive de Asino aureo. Libri XI. Floridorum. Libri IV. De deo Socratis libellus. Apologiae libri II. Trismegisti dialogus. De mundo sive de Cosmographia Liber I. Apuleius, ca. 124- after 171, Lucius Apuleius Madaurensis.
Quae in toto Opere continentur. L. Apuleii Madaurensis. Metamorphoseon sive de Asino aureo. Libri XI. Floridorum. Libri IV. De deo Socratis libellus. Apologiae libri II. Trismegisti dialogus. De mundo sive de Cosmographia Liber I.
Quae in toto Opere continentur. L. Apuleii Madaurensis. Metamorphoseon sive de Asino aureo. Libri XI. Floridorum. Libri IV. De deo Socratis libellus. Apologiae libri II. Trismegisti dialogus. De mundo sive de Cosmographia Liber I.
Quae in toto Opere continentur. L. Apuleii Madaurensis. Metamorphoseon sive de Asino aureo. Libri XI. Floridorum. Libri IV. De deo Socratis libellus. Apologiae libri II. Trismegisti dialogus. De mundo sive de Cosmographia Liber I.
Quae in toto Opere continentur. L. Apuleii Madaurensis. Metamorphoseon sive de Asino aureo. Libri XI. Floridorum. Libri IV. De deo Socratis libellus. Apologiae libri II. Trismegisti dialogus. De mundo sive de Cosmographia Liber I.
Quae in toto Opere continentur. L. Apuleii Madaurensis. Metamorphoseon sive de Asino aureo. Libri XI. Floridorum. Libri IV. De deo Socratis libellus. Apologiae libri II. Trismegisti dialogus. De mundo sive de Cosmographia Liber I.

Quae in toto Opere continentur. L. Apuleii Madaurensis. Metamorphoseon sive de Asino aureo. Libri XI. Floridorum. Libri IV. De deo Socratis libellus. Apologiae libri II. Trismegisti dialogus. De mundo sive de Cosmographia Liber I.

Florence: Heirs of Filippo Giunta, 1522.

Price: $6,800.00

Octavo: 16 x 10 cm. ff. [vi], [2, blank], ‘273’ [recte 255], [1] (erratically foliated). Collation: a-z8, et, cum, rum8, A-F8 (complete with both blanks.)

SECOND GIUNTA EDITION.

A very good copy, re-cased in early vellum; cancelled ownership inscription and purchase note ‘Iste liber est mei Landi de Landis de Eugubio emptu Rome die 27 aprilis 1537…’ to verso of rear free endpaper; ownership inscription to recto and verso of title obscured with early ink strikethrough (Ludovici [?]); two front free endpapers filled with abundant manuscript comments on Apuleius; extensive marginal manuscript annotations to books I, II, VI, and VII of the Metamorphoses and shorter annotations scattered throughout the other works. Giunta device on title and final leaf.

Extensively annotated copy of the celebrated 1522 Giunta edition of Apuleius’s works, representing a notable improvement on its predecessors.

Editorial care was entrusted to Bernardus Philomathes (Bernardo Pisano), a prominent Italian composer, priest, singer, and scholar. He was one of the first madrigalists, and the first composer to have a collection of secular music printed devoted to his work alone. This edition ‘must be regarded as being of great value and deserves a full collation’ (Roberson, Apuleius, (1940)).

The most enduringly successful of Apuleius’s works is the Metamorphoses, or The Golden Ass, the only Latin novel to survive in its entirety. ‘A delightful work, imaginative, humorous, and exciting, it tells the adventures of one Lucius who, being too curious concerning the black art, is accidentally turned into an ass, and, thus disguised, endures, sees, and hears many strange things. He is at last restored to human shape by the goddess Iris. Many stories are embedded in the novel, the most famous being the exquisite tale of Cupid and Psyche’ (Oxford Classical Dictionary). Yet, at the time of this publication, the other works included in the corpus would also have been of great interest and relevance, as texts imbued with Platonic notions.

The Perfect Discourse, Apuleius’ supposed translation of the lost dialogue Asclepius, attributed to Hermes Trismegistus, remained the only philosophical Hermetic work known in the West during the Middle Ages; notwithstanding the Christian objection to the magic elements, such texts were held in high regard by Renaissance philosophers such as Ficino and Giordano Bruno. This copy was owned and annotated by a sixteenth-century humanist, Lando de’ Landi of Gubbio. Although apparently unrecorded as a scholar, Lando reveals himself as a competent lexicographer, insisting frequently on etymological questions, and a learned lover of adagia, quoted from Suetonius, Cicero, Sallust, Lucretius, Plutarch, and others.

Adams A-1376; Index Aureliensis 106; Renouard, Giunta 62

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