Architettura Civile Del Padre D. Guarino Guarini Cherico Regolare Opera Postuma Dedicata A Sua Sacra Reale Maestà. Guarino ARCHITECTURE. Guarini.
Architettura Civile Del Padre D. Guarino Guarini Cherico Regolare Opera Postuma Dedicata A Sua Sacra Reale Maestà
Architettura Civile Del Padre D. Guarino Guarini Cherico Regolare Opera Postuma Dedicata A Sua Sacra Reale Maestà
Architettura Civile Del Padre D. Guarino Guarini Cherico Regolare Opera Postuma Dedicata A Sua Sacra Reale Maestà
Architettura Civile Del Padre D. Guarino Guarini Cherico Regolare Opera Postuma Dedicata A Sua Sacra Reale Maestà
Architettura Civile Del Padre D. Guarino Guarini Cherico Regolare Opera Postuma Dedicata A Sua Sacra Reale Maestà
Architettura Civile Del Padre D. Guarino Guarini Cherico Regolare Opera Postuma Dedicata A Sua Sacra Reale Maestà
Architettura Civile Del Padre D. Guarino Guarini Cherico Regolare Opera Postuma Dedicata A Sua Sacra Reale Maestà
Architettura Civile Del Padre D. Guarino Guarini Cherico Regolare Opera Postuma Dedicata A Sua Sacra Reale Maestà
Architettura Civile Del Padre D. Guarino Guarini Cherico Regolare Opera Postuma Dedicata A Sua Sacra Reale Maestà
Architettura Civile Del Padre D. Guarino Guarini Cherico Regolare Opera Postuma Dedicata A Sua Sacra Reale Maestà
Architettura Civile Del Padre D. Guarino Guarini Cherico Regolare Opera Postuma Dedicata A Sua Sacra Reale Maestà

Architettura Civile Del Padre D. Guarino Guarini Cherico Regolare Opera Postuma Dedicata A Sua Sacra Reale Maestà

Turin: Gianfrancesco Mairesse, 1737.

Price: $13,500.00

Folio: 36 x 24 cm. Pagination: [viii], 307, [1 (errata)] pp., engraved port. frontispiece. Collation: π1 (port), *4, A-Z4, Aa-Pp4, Qq2. With 79 engraved plates.

FIRST COMPLETE EDITION AND THE FIRST WITH THE TEXT.

Bound in contemporary limp vellum. Engraved portrait frontispiece of Guarini, printed title with large woodcut device with the arms of the dedicatee Emanuele III Duke of Savoy and King of Sardinia. Profusely illustrated with 79 engraved plates by Antonio Verga, Francesco Guenotto, Giovanni Fayneau, Giovanni Abbiati, and Antonio de Piene, all after drawings by Guarini. In this copy, the plates are mounted on folding sheets.

A very good copy, complete with all the plates, bound in its original binding. The text is very clean aside from minor spotting and soiling to the title and portrait plate. The plates exhibit the variable foxing and light toning typical of this production. Tear to blank margin of leaf B1 (not affecting text), four plates browned, a few plates separating from their pasted guards. Minor tears to the inserted blanks.

Guarino Guarini, also called Camillo Guarini, (born January 17, 1624, Modena - died March 6, 1683, Milan), Italian architect, mathematician, and theologian whose designs and books on architecture made him a major source for later Baroque architects. Guarini was in Rome during 1639–47, when Borromini was most active. Later he taught in Modena, Messina, and Paris and finally in 1666 went to Turin, where he stayed for the greater part of the remainder of his life. While in Turin in the service of the dukes of Savoy, Guarini built (or furnished designs for) at least six churches and chapels, five palaces, and a city gate; and published six books, two on architecture and four on mathematics and astronomy.”(Brittanica)

“This 1737 publication is the complete version (plates and text) of the architectural treatise by the architect Guarino Guarini, edited by the architect Bernardo Vittone from the manuscripts and plates owned by the Theatine order in Turin. This is the first edition of the text (the first ed. of 1686 consisted only of plates)… The design of all the plates is attributed to Guarini. The book was edited by the architect Bernardo Vittone (1704-1770)…

“This definitive edition of 1737 contains a few additional plates, on geometry and columns, and an extensive text. The text, providing a measure of Guarini's personality, is divided into five ‘treatises’: on architecture (‘Dell' architettura’), ichnography (‘Icnografia’), elevations (‘Ortografia elevata’), three-dimensional representation (‘ortografia gettata’), and geodesy (‘Geodesia’). The first part is accompanied by three plates, the second part by five plates, the third part by twenty plates, the fourth part by fourteen plates, and the fifth part by three plates. Thirty-four additional plates follow the illustrated text. The plates are essential for an understanding of his unbuilt projects and destroyed buildings…

“There are four significant aspects to Guarini's treatise. The structure of the work is entirely transparent, largely unrelated to any other treatise, revealing on every page good sense and extraordinary critical faculties. Guarini was open to rational arguments typical of the seventeenth century, and he was neither eccentric nor fanatical. Second, although he accepts no definitive authority, Guarini's erudition is impressive, and his criticism of others remains reserved and moderate throughout. Often polemical, Guarini is an expert writer, agile, vivacious, and witty. Third, acquainted and appreciative of numerous buildings, Guarini applied the same careful and detailed research to the artistic and architectural tradition that he applied to the literary tradition. Finally, he was the only one among Italian architects to learn the great lesson from French mathematicians, introducing it in his chapter on the ‘Ortografia gettata,’ where he explains the significance of the new geometry. The new geometry was the basis for Guarini's audacious buildings (Wittkower, in Guarino Guarini 1970).

“Guarini's passionate fantasy fused his religious zeal, his vivid visual memory, great perception, new mathematical intuition, and methodical study and work. Guarini writes that architecture is ‘adulatrice’ (Argan, in Guarino Guarini 1970) thus it can serve to celebrate, ceremonialize, and render homage. The significance of Guarini's method is located in his treatise rather than his buildings, since he believed that the work of the architect is to design. Thus he discusses the instruments the architect needs in the design process, and his drawings are precise, a long way from the furor of Borromini's compositions. Guarini does not assume classical architecture as the universal model and deals with the columns in an encyclopedic manner, providing the graphic construction of each and adding the ‘gothic’ and ‘atlantic’ orders (Argan, in Guarino Guarini 1970). His waving, ‘ondeggiante’, Corinthian order is a great departure from previous compositions. Like Claude Perrault, Guarini believed that architecture can correct the rules of antiquity and invent new ones…

“Guarini's architecture is entirely about building, eliminating Vitruvius' definition of architecture that includes clock making and machine building. The task of the architect is to design, which according to Guarini -who aligns himself with Vitruvius in this instance- can be carried out through plan, section, and elevation (though he neglects to discuss the Vitruvian ‘scaenographia’). Guarini's tendency toward mathematical abstraction is offset by his utilitarian understanding of architecture; he brings the Vitruvian triad of ‘firmitas, utilitas, and venustas’ under the rubric of ‘commodità’. Convenience also implies not exceeding the cost of the building and thus being able to complete construction. Guarini criticizes Andrea Palladio for having induced the Vicentine nobility to build too sumptuously, which led to incomplete buildings, and refers to Pope Urban VIII's quip that to state honestly the cost of a building is to behave more like a good Christian than a good architect…

“As treatise writer, Guarini aspires prodigiously toward the invention of new images and, drawing from a professional knowledge of architectural tradition, transforms it radically. Guarini's sources are easy to reconstruct since he cites and quotes generously. These references can be divided into three distinct areas: writ­ers on art and science from Greek and Latin antiquity, Renaissance writers on architecture, and contemporary thinkers in every discipline. (Guarini's breadth of knowledge was linked to his travels as a Theatine and as a teacher in the order.) He reforms the Vitruvian tradition, and he would have undermined the entire Vitruvian structure more than any other thinker of his time if the posthumous publication of his 1686 writings had not been delayed so long (Cavallari-Murat, in Guarino Guarini 1970).”(Millard Catalogue).

Millard Italian no. 50; Berlin Cat. 2620; Cicognara 526; Fowler 150; RIBA, Early Printed Books, 1391; Riccardi i: 637

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