Fabbriche fatte sul porto di Pesaro. Gianfrancesco Buonamici.
Fabbriche fatte sul porto di Pesaro
Fabbriche fatte sul porto di Pesaro
Fabbriche fatte sul porto di Pesaro
Fabbriche fatte sul porto di Pesaro
Fabbriche fatte sul porto di Pesaro
Fabbriche fatte sul porto di Pesaro
Fabbriche fatte sul porto di Pesaro
Fabbriche fatte sul porto di Pesaro
Fabbriche fatte sul porto di Pesaro
Fabbriche fatte sul porto di Pesaro
Fabbriche fatte sul porto di Pesaro

Fabbriche fatte sul porto di Pesaro

Bologna: Lelio dalla Volpe, 1754.

Price: $7,500.00

Folio: 39 x 27 cm. [I-II], III-XIII, [3] pp. Collation: A3, B4, chi1. With eight added plates.

SOLE EDITION.

Bound in 19th c. half vellum and blue paper over boards (lightly stained.) A clean copy with wide margins printed on fine paper. Splits along the fold discreetly mended on three plates with slight discoloration and a few tiny defects. Engraved vignette on title, half-page engraving with the arms of the dedicatee on the 2nd leaf, a large engraved tailpiece drafting tools at the end of the text, and eight large folding etchings of the architectural project. Extremely rare. One copy traced in North America (Avery Library).

An extremely rare work, written by the Rimini-born architect Gianfrancesco Buonamici, detailing his project for the restoration and renewal of the port of Pesaro on Italy’s Adriatic coast. Buonamici received the commission from the Papal Cardinal-legate Gianfrancesco Stoppani, to whom this work is dedicated. Buonamici’s port project would later earn him membership in Rome’s prestigious Accademia di San Luca.

The project had a tremendous impact on the city. In addition to improving the economy, the port complex raised the city’s architectural profile. In the true spirit of the Baroque, it served as a scenic backdrop when viewed from the villas on the Colle S. Bartolo. It also invigorated the cultural life of the city by creating a new quarter on par with the other showpiece areas of the city. Tragically, a large part of the port was destroyed by a flood in 1765, making this book an invaluable record of this major project.

The first seven of the large folding etchings illustrate some of the major structures: the tower that serves as the harbor’s lantern, the massive roofed, colonnaded boat shed -for building and repairing boats- and the adjacent buildings for the hull caulkers; the central building housing the captains and deputies of the port and the offices of the health ministry; and the grand fountain. The seventh plate shows a plan of the “old port”, depicting the few modest buildings and undeveloped area that Buonamici’s modern plan was designed to replace.

The eighth plate, 100 cm. long, depicts the entire project in elevation and plan, allowing us to see how the various structures and ancillary components function as a whole. For instance, the massive boat shed (teggia) is in close proximity to the slips from which the boats are launched into the canal leading into the harbor. The combination of elevation and plan on one plate allows us to see such minute details as the women’s lavatory and the fountain outlet, built into the face of the canal, that allows ships to replenish their water supply from the canal edge.