Item #4489 Ὀλυμπία. Πύθια. Νεμέα. Ἴσθμια. Olympia. Pythia. Nemea. Isthmia. Pindar, B C.
Ὀλυμπία. Πύθια. Νεμέα. Ἴσθμια. Olympia. Pythia. Nemea. Isthmia.
Ὀλυμπία. Πύθια. Νεμέα. Ἴσθμια. Olympia. Pythia. Nemea. Isthmia.
Ὀλυμπία. Πύθια. Νεμέα. Ἴσθμια. Olympia. Pythia. Nemea. Isthmia.
Ὀλυμπία. Πύθια. Νεμέα. Ἴσθμια. Olympia. Pythia. Nemea. Isthmia.
Ὀλυμπία. Πύθια. Νεμέα. Ἴσθμια. Olympia. Pythia. Nemea. Isthmia.

Ὀλυμπία. Πύθια. Νεμέα. Ἴσθμια. Olympia. Pythia. Nemea. Isthmia.

Frankfurt: Peter Braubach, 1542.

Price: $7,500.00

Quarto: 19.5 x 13.5 cm. 370 leaves (with blanks leaves 156, 255, 332), (8) leaves Index & Errata (the last blank). Collation: a-z8/4, aa-zz4/8 (cc4 and 558 blank), aaa-ppp4/8, qqq6 (iii4 and qqq6 blank).

Contemporary blindstamped pigskin, two clasps. The binding is by Paul Thiele, active in Wittenberg from 1555 to 1575; see the image with his initials P and T left and right of David’s head on the King David roll used on this binding. Printing in red and black on three divisional title pages and leaves 2, 158-164, 258-260. Title pages with four different woodcut borders (two of these with Braubach’s printer’s mark.) A fine copy with occ. ink smudges (courtesy of the printers), first title soiled.

Peter Brubach’s edition of Pindar’s “Odes” is based on the 1515 edition printed at Rome by Zacharias Kallierges, with variant readings from the 1513 Aldus' Editio Princeps given in the printed marginalia ("Copie de l'édition de Calliergi, enrichie de quelques variantes tirées de l'édition d'Alde." - Brunet). Includes the scholia by Demetrius Triclinius, a 14th-century Byzantine scholar, a native of Thessalonica.

“Pindar was revered in antiquity as the ‘prince of lyric poets’ based on a wide range of his Greek compositions, of which a solitary category survives intact: his forty-four victory songs (‘epinicia’) composed for formal celebrations at the four panhellenic athletic festivals. Late in the Roman Empire, Alexandrian scholars preserved and divided these into four sets, or books, respectively called in Latin the Olympia, Pythia (from Delphi), Nemea (for the town so named in the Peloponnese), and Isthmia (after the environs of Corinth)--or Olympian, Pythian, Nemean, and Isthmian odes. The scale of his surviving corpus is a measure of the value that Pindar, in common with other Greeks, placed on athletics as a proving ground for the highest human qualities. His intricate and at times incomprehensible style challenged the determination of his copyists through the ages, moved by the lofty expression of segments they could understand, to preserve other segments they could not. All the odes were intended for choral performance to music now lost; they were divided into regular stanzas, either strophic or triadic, but no two poems are metrically identical.”(Bauer, Problems in the Aldine Pindar).

VD16 P 2795; Hoffmann III, 256; Adams P 1223 (variant with marginal note on g4); Fogelmark, The Kallierges Pindar, 236f.

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