Breve relatione del P. Diego de Torres della Compagnia di Giesù. Procuratore della provincia del Perù, circa il frutto che si raccoglie con gli indiani di quel regno, dove si raccontano anche alcuni particolari notabili successi gli anni prossimi passati [...] Al fine s'aggiunge la lettera annua dell'isole Filippine del 1600. Diego de PERU AND THE PHILIPPINES. Torres Bollo, Francisco Vaez.
Breve relatione del P. Diego de Torres della Compagnia di Giesù. Procuratore della provincia del Perù, circa il frutto che si raccoglie con gli indiani di quel regno, dove si raccontano anche alcuni particolari notabili successi gli anni prossimi passati [...] Al fine s'aggiunge la lettera annua dell'isole Filippine del 1600
Breve relatione del P. Diego de Torres della Compagnia di Giesù. Procuratore della provincia del Perù, circa il frutto che si raccoglie con gli indiani di quel regno, dove si raccontano anche alcuni particolari notabili successi gli anni prossimi passati [...] Al fine s'aggiunge la lettera annua dell'isole Filippine del 1600
Breve relatione del P. Diego de Torres della Compagnia di Giesù. Procuratore della provincia del Perù, circa il frutto che si raccoglie con gli indiani di quel regno, dove si raccontano anche alcuni particolari notabili successi gli anni prossimi passati [...] Al fine s'aggiunge la lettera annua dell'isole Filippine del 1600
Breve relatione del P. Diego de Torres della Compagnia di Giesù. Procuratore della provincia del Perù, circa il frutto che si raccoglie con gli indiani di quel regno, dove si raccontano anche alcuni particolari notabili successi gli anni prossimi passati [...] Al fine s'aggiunge la lettera annua dell'isole Filippine del 1600
Breve relatione del P. Diego de Torres della Compagnia di Giesù. Procuratore della provincia del Perù, circa il frutto che si raccoglie con gli indiani di quel regno, dove si raccontano anche alcuni particolari notabili successi gli anni prossimi passati [...] Al fine s'aggiunge la lettera annua dell'isole Filippine del 1600

Breve relatione del P. Diego de Torres della Compagnia di Giesù. Procuratore della provincia del Perù, circa il frutto che si raccoglie con gli indiani di quel regno, dove si raccontano anche alcuni particolari notabili successi gli anni prossimi passati [...] Al fine s'aggiunge la lettera annua dell'isole Filippine del 1600

Venice: Giovanni Battista Ciotti, 1604.

Price: $6,500.00

Octavo: 14.5 x 9.5 cm. 101, [1 blank] pp. Collation: A-E8, F12. Lacking the final blank leaf F12.

THIRD EDITION, after the first (Rome) in 1603, and second (Milan), both printed in 1603. A Latin edition also appeared at Rome in 1603.

Bound in modern vellum. A very good copy with scattered foxing and occasional, short worm-trail, discreetly filled, in signature C, restoration to the lower outer corner of leaf F11 slightly affecting the last few words, which have been skillfully supplied by hand. Woodcut Jesuits' emblem on title page. The Lettera annua dell'isole Filippine, scritta dal P. Francesco Vaez, alli 10. di giugno 1601 opens with a half title on leaf E2v.

Torres Bollo left for Peru in 1580. He was rector in Cuzco and Quito, first vice-provincial of New Granada and provincial of Paraguay from 1606 to 1614. He died in Plata in 1638. The volume also includes letters from other missionary fathers (Romero, Monroyo, Ortiz, Samaniego, and Vasquez). The second part, which opens with its own half title on p. 70, contains a report from the Philippines by Francisco Vaez. The latter, originally from Segovia, was sent by the order to Mexico, of which he became provincial and where he died in 1619.

“An account of the Jesuit province in Peru, incorporating the letters of Fathers Romero, Monroyo, Ortiz, Samaniego and Vasquez. Torres, a Spaniard, joined the Jesuits in 1571 and went to the New World in the late 1580s, serving as rector in Cuzco, Quito, and Potosì. He represented the province in Rome between 1600 and 1604 and returned to America to establish a vice-province in New Granada (Colombia) in 1605. Even more ambitiously, he planned the expedition to convert the Guaycuru Indians of the Chaco in order to open the route through Peru for the missions. In 1607 he established the Jesuit province in Paraguay and is credited with sending the first two Jesuit missionaries to found the reducciones (the so-called Jesuit republics) among the Guaranì in late 1609.”(B. Quaritch Ltd, The Society of Jesus 1548-1773, London, 1996, no. 219).

“Torres Bollo reorganized the Jesuit missionary enterprise in Juli on the shores of Lake Titicaca, allowing himself to be inspired by the communitarianism of the Inca Empire and the experiences of Nöbrega’s experiences in Brazil. The combination of these two elements implied respect for indigenous culture and spatial separation of the Indians from the colonial environment. Torres can be seen as the intellectual father of the Jesuit reductions.”(Hans-Jürgen Prien, Christianity in Latin America, p. 193)

The Letter from the Philippines:

The Peruvian section is followed by Francisco Vaez's report from the Philippines, one of the earliest ethnographical accounts by Jesuits from the region. The letter, written on 10th June 1601, describe the College at Manila as well as the Jesuit residences at Antipolo, Zebu, Bohol, Samar, Dulac, and Alangalan. The chapters contain interesting geographical and ethnographic information, with the progress of Christian indoctrination and conversion providing a revealing look at aboriginal Indian idol worship. Natural historical curiosities also receive some attention (See Blair and Robertson, Philippine Islands, 11: 199.)

In one vivid scene, a crocodile eats a man whole:

“The custom has everywhere been introduced of singing throughout the year, in honor of the Virgin Mother of God, the anthem Salve Regina, and on Saturdays in Lent of performing the discipline in church. So when some Indians were bathing in the river, as is the custom in hot countries, and heard the bell give the call for the Salve and the discipline, they put on their clothes and set out. Only one remained and laughing at his companions said in their language: “Acoi Ouian”—that is “Bring back something for me. “ which is their expression of ridicule. When the others had gone away, he who was alone was attacked and killed by a crocodile—a fierce animal of these regions, which very fond of human flesh—and that before they could render him any assistance spiritual or temporal. This event was indeed an occasion of no little wonder, for the beast is very voracious and swallows men whole, or piece by piece, or at least tears off hand or foot; but this man he left whole and untorn, which the Indians attribute to the Salve they sang and the discipline that they performed.”(trans. Maria Cecilia Holt, in “The River:Jesuit Missions and Exemplarity in Spanish Colonial Philippines 1581-1768”(2014).

Griffin, Philippines, p. 79; Bibliotheca Americana: Catalogue of the John Carter Brown Library in Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, 2:28; Alden, European Americana 604/86; Palau, 336831 (note); Sabin, 96253; De Backer-Sommervogel, VIII, 132 and 363 (first edition).